▷ 20 Surprising Ways to Use Thyme Essential Oil (2019 Update)
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Thyme Essential Oil: Benefits, Side Effects and Dosage

Thyme Essential Oil

There are several species of Thyme essential oil, however most lack formal testing. The two chemo types of Thyme most often used for essential oils are Thyme vulgaris ct linalool and Thyme vulgaris ct. thymus.

CT is chemo or chemical type. I often hear people mistakenly say that "essential oils are natural, there is no chemistry or chemicals." They are right about the chemicals as long as an oil has not been adulterated. However, everything in life does indeed involve chemistry. Everything thing in life is composed of molecules, including plants and its counterpart, essential oils.

Thyme vulgaris ct. thymol

Thyme vulgaris ct. thymol is classified as being part of the phenol chemical family. Thyme ct. thymol carries not one, but two chemical constituents from the phenol chemical family, carvacrol and thymol, a double hit on the skin and mucous membranes when not used with care.

Internally there are concerns of drug interactions and it can inhibit blood clotting, a real concern for those with bleeding disorders, hemophilia or those preparing for major surgery. Thyme ct. thymol is recommended at maximum topical use of 1.3%. (1)

Despite carvacrol and thymols concerns, they are beneficial. They possess strong antioxidant properties and when used wisely with safety in mind, it’s a great oil to have on hand. So how can we use this oil safely?

Maximum suggested topical uses by age are as follows:

  • 0-24 months do not use
  • 2-6 years old - 0.25%
  • 6-15 years old - 0.5%
  • 15 plus and during pregnancy - stay under 1.3% to avoid irritation or possible allergic reaction

Nine drops of essential oil to one-ounce of carrier oil = 1%. Charts and maximums are often given based on averages. When treating children, take into consideration your child on an average chart.

Charts and maximums are often given based on averages. When treating children, take into consideration your child on an average chart. A chart will reflect below, average and above average. You alone know where your child is in development.

For example, if your child is below average size and 8 years old, then dilute to 0.25% rather than the maximum given below of 0.5%, which is based on the average child. If your child also has sensitive skin, this must also be taken into consideration.

Thyme ct. thymol has a host of therapeutic actions including, but not limited to, as an analgesic (pain reliever), antimicrobial, antioxidant, eases rheumatoid and other arthritic related pain and inflammation, fights viral and bacterial infections, astringent, circulatory stimulant, expectorant and decongestant.

When using irritant oils, blend with skin-friendly oil